news
CATEGORIES   |   ALL UPDATES   |   SEARCH   |   DONATE

Myth-busting common ‘problems’ when retraining racehorses

Retraining of Racehorses
Fred and Rowena Cook run Equine Management and Training, specialising in the retraining of racehorses. They are the authors of Re-educating Racehorses — life after racing. Here they bust some common myths surrounding retraining racehorses…

“Racehorses do not hack out”
Yes they do. After all, most racehorses have to hack to and from the gallops.

“Racehorses do not get any turnout”
While not necessarily from dawn to dusk or every day, these days it is very common to see racehorses out grazing.

“They are not good doers”
Any issues with weight gain and maintaining condition are purely the result of incorrect feeding or an issue such as gastric ulcers, a dental problem or worms, for example.

“Thoroughbreds have poor feet”
This is only because front shoes are put on so early in their lives before the digital cushion is properly developed. Just because a horse is a thoroughbred it doesn’t mean it has to have poor feet — foot condition can be radically improved with the right diet and proper farriery.

“Racehorses are trained to favour a particular foreleg lead”
When a racehorse is galloping no one even thinks about which is the leading leg.

“Racehorses are reluctant to pick up their hind feet”
This myth has seemingly stemmed from the fact that quite a number of racehorses do not have hind shoes on.

“All racehorses have vices”
No they do not…

“All ex-racehorses are strong”
Not true. Granted, some are strong but so are many horses out hunting. Strength should not be confused with a horse that leans due to lack of strength and engagement.

“Racehorses are difficult to fit saddles to”
This stems from some thoroughbreds having high withers, but this is not an issue for an experienced saddle fitter.

Ref Horse & Hound; 1 September 2020

Share

More Posts

Randox Health Cross Country Clinic Report

Treo Eile held our very first thoroughbred Cross Country clinic, made possible by the generous sponsorship of Randox Health. The response was overwhelming, with all spots filling up within a blink of an eye. Our host for the day was none other than Sally Corscadden, a HSI Level 3 Coach, who welcomed us to her

Feeding for a Balanced Temperment

Feeding for a balanced temperament brought to you by Nicole Groyer, Nutritionist at Connolly’s Red Mills Although diet alone cannot change your horse’s actual temperament, it can have a significant effect on their behaviour. This article will focus on how we can optimise the diet of excitable, anxious or ‘stressy’ horses. Protein – Friend or

Tattersalls Ireland Treo Eile Showing Pathway Series 2024

Press Release    Tattersalls Ireland is thrilled to announce its continued sponsorship of the Tattersalls Ireland / Treo Eile Showing Pathway Series 2024. This partnership underscores our mutual dedication to promoting the development and retraining of thoroughbreds, showcasing their potential as successful riding horses. The Showing Pathway Series 2024, comprising eight qualifiers, will commence on

Tattersalls Ireland Treo Eile Showing Pathway Series Information & Conditions

The aim of the Tattersalls Ireland / Treo Eile Showing Pathway Series 2024 is to identify racehorses which are judged to have transitioned to be suitable riding horses.  The horses entered in the classes should demonstrate good movement, rideability and correct conformation. Each class will be judged as a hunter class.   THE DURATION The

CONTACT US

Clarendon

Digby Bridge

Sallins

Co. Kildare

Ireland

Newsletter signup